Resident Stories

resident-storiesWhile these stories are of HCC Residents, their names have been changed to protect their privacy

 


From the moment you come through these front doors, hope and care are instantly yours.

Our staff and friends have only one goal: to take those who are ill and make them healthy, happy and whole.

Your stay may be long or your stay may be short; yet regardless the time: You have all our support.

By: James C. Hutsell (Butch) 2/7/2009
HopeCareCenter Resident

 


Earlier this year Hope admitted a young woman who, according to her chart, was near death due to various circumstances. She could barely walk; staying up for a 30 minute meal was definitely very difficult for her. Her general physical condition was very poor but her will to improve was always there. She continued to follow physician’s orders, take her medications, eat a balanced diet and keep her attitude very positive. Now 90 days later, you would not recognize this young woman. She has gained weight, is able to walk around Powell Gardens and enjoy the plants, enjoy trips to Starlight Theater and become a positive role model for other residents. She will continue to be goodwill ambassador with every new resident that needs her.

 


Lou’s story is representative of a common pattern that we see at Hope Care Center. Lou came to Hope and got better and returned to independent living. This was not an immediate success story; it took time and it was complicated at many points along the way.

Lou was a resident at Hope for just over five years. Lou came to Hope very ill and it took time for improvements to occur. As happens many times, new problems and conditions came along periodically and new medications and treatments were needed. Slowly over time Lou became stronger and more able to be independent. During the later part of Lou’s stay at Hope, the dream of returning to independent living began to take shape as a real possibility. Lou worked with the Hope Care Center staff to learn about medications and to develop skills that would be needed for independence.

Eventually Lou was able to leave Hope Care Center, first moving to assisted living and then, in turn, moving on to an apartment where the dream of independent living was finally accomplished.

 


Pat is a twenty-something resident at Hope Care Center who truly shows that the best possible outcomes can occur even when the most difficult circumstances are present. During the summer of 2008 Hope was contacted by a Social Worker from another Aids Service Organization (ASO) about the possible admission of someone they were helping, Pat. This was the second time in several months that Hope had been contacted about Pat. After the first inquiry, Pat’s family had made the decision to continue caring for Pat at home, but despite admirable intentions Pat’s condition declined rapidly, to the point that Pat’s doctors were very concerned about survival.

This situation was complicated by medical conditions that made even the admission very difficult to accomplish. Hope Care Center worked with Pat’s other care providers, several ASO’s and the two state agencies and Pat was admitted to Hope within twenty-four hours after the initial call from the Social Worker.

As happens in many cases when a new resident arrives at Hope, Pat began to improve quickly. The healing, home-like environment at Hope, along with close monitoring of medications and much-needed nourishing food proved to be just what Pat needed. Pat’s condition improved as shown by consistent improvements in his/her viral load to the point that it is now undetectable.

Pat still faces many challenges, but is currently doing extremely well and looking forward to the long, full life that is ahead.

 

 

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